Water and sanitation are human rights and yet 785 million of people live without access to water and 2 billion without decent sanitation.

This project seeks to raise raise awareness of this issue



For many communities, water sources are usually far from homes, and it typically falls to women and girls to spend much of their time and energy fetching water, a task which often exposes them to attack from men and even wild animals. Without improved sanitation people have no choice but to use inadequate communal latrines or to practise open defecation. Finding a place to go to the toilet outside, often having to wait until the cover of darkness, can leave them vulnerable to abuse and sexual assault. In the immediate environment, exposed faecal matter will be transferred back into people’s food and water resources, helping to spread serious diseases such as cholera. 

The project also dabbles into spirituality, functionality and gender, referencing Nigerian-Yoruba sitting sculptures with the poses. It dwells on the healing qualities of water as an integral part of a thing. Water is a basic element of life and an essential factor in the Yoruba Tradition. Yoruba believe water to be a symbol of force and strength.

A Lopsided Tale VII, 2022

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A Lopsided Tale VI, 2021

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A Lopsided Tale I, 2020

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A Lopsided Tale VI, 2020

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A Lopsided Tale III, 2020

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A Lopsided Tale II, 2020

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